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Best Practices Before Converting Midi Tracks To Audio?

Discussion in 'Logic Pro X' started by GHBrodbeck, Oct 20, 2014.

  1. GHBrodbeck

    GHBrodbeck New Member

    Hi,
    Most Midi Instruments (or probably all) in Pro X come with presets and plug-ins attached, some even including re-routs to buses.
    I'm a bit confused how to handle such a track or multiple tracks before bouncing them to audio.
    Do I leave all the attached presets/plug-ins/buses as they are and do the bounce?
    When mixing with the resulting audio tracks it is very likely that I will add other plug-ins to fine-tune the final sound.
    Will that not create overload of effect over effect over effect?
    It's a daunting task to know what to do.
    Any advice from experienced "mixers"?
    Many thanks,
    GHB:confused:
     
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  3. bayswater

    bayswater Senior member

    "Do I leave all the attached presets/plug-ins/buses as they are and do the bounce?"

    That's pretty much up to you. The plugins, routings, etc are there to create a specific sound. If you like the sound, keep the settings when you bounce. If not, change them to something you like.

    "When mixing with the resulting audio tracks it is very likely that I will add other plug-ins to fine-tune the final sound.
    Will that not create overload of effect over effect over effect?"

    One of the reasons for bouncing (or freezing) is to avoid the overload. As long as you choose the correct output bus for the bounce, the effects will be in the resulting audio, and can be turned off.

    But as long as you have the processing capacity, you can just tweak MIDI, effects, routing to your heart's content, and get the whole thing right before you do a bounce.
     
  4. GHBrodbeck

    GHBrodbeck New Member

    Thanks for your advice Bayswater.
    I realize it's a matter of trusting my ears and practice makes perfect (or close to it).
    Could you elaborate a bit more on:
    "As long as you choose the correct output bus for the bounce, the effects will be in the resulting audio, and can be turned off."
    Not sure if "correct output bus" is something special I have to choose before I bounce.
    Are you saying that when I convert a piano track (with a Logic sample instrument) without touching any of the settings, I will have access to the effects in the resulting audio tracks?
    Appreciate your time, regards,
    GHB
     
  5. bayswater

    bayswater Senior member

    Nothing complicated. By defaults, Logic bounces whatever is played through Output 1-2. If you have more complex routing where some effects are routed to some other output, they won't be captured in the bounce.
     
  6. GHBrodbeck

    GHBrodbeck New Member

    Thanks again.
    I'll go and do some mastering!
    GHB
     
  7. Jay Asher

    Jay Asher Senior member

    IMHO (and that of one of my favorite engineers):

    The Logic Pro channel strip settings are designed to make each software instrument/audio track have a specific sound and sound great when you play them or listen to them soloed..

    But mixing is not about making each sound great, it is about making them blend.

    The single best thing you can do for your mix is to bypass all of them and then add/change/replace them as your ears tell you your mix needs.
     
  8. Eli

    Eli Senior member

    Ditto what Jay says!

    Those channel strip settings are IMHO designed for instant gratification. Call them up, and they sound like finished completely processed sounds right away. But using them within a larger mix does not necessarily mean you want all that processing. So, depending on the processing involved you may want to bypass or remove the plug-ins when you want to start focusing on the mix stage of your workflow.

    For compressors, EQs, reverbs etc, I would suggest bypassing or removing them and then setting them as you need. For more special effects type processing that really help create the sound, like delays, chorus/flanger, MIDI effects, thats' a different story. They may be more necessary to maintain the continuity of the sound you started with out of the Library.
     
  9. GHBrodbeck

    GHBrodbeck New Member

    Thanks guys, some great advice.
    It definitively sounds like my ears are my best guide.
    I'll keep trying different solutions.
    It's a huge subject because there are so many ways to get to a great mix.
    As I said: Practice makes perfect.
    GHB
     
  10. mt100uk

    mt100uk Senior member

    If you are at all unsure if you want to commit you might want to have a look at "Song Alternatives." It lets you create other versions of a song within the same project. It's useful if you're not 100% sure of a big step (such as bouncing in place/by track etc.)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  11. Jay Asher

    Jay Asher Senior member

    Actually it is "Project Alternatives" and indeed I always save as an alternative before I commit to audio.
     
  12. mt100uk

    mt100uk Senior member

    Never good with the proper names of things within logic ;-)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

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