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Logic Pro X on a Mac Mini?

Discussion in 'Logic Pro X' started by Blastmage, Jan 15, 2014.

  1. Blastmage

    Blastmage New Member

    Good evening. New to the forum but a long time Logic user.

    My early 2007 Mac Pro is about ready for retirement and while I really like the look of the new ones I'm not in the mood to spend $3K + right now. I'm thinking about a new Mac Mini. I can fully load one for about half the cost of a new, baseline Mac Pro.

    My question to the forum: is anyone running Logic X (or Ableton Live 9) on a Mac Mini? Will I see a big difference in performance between my old Mac Pro's 2x2.66 Ghz dual-core Intel Xeon and the new Mac Mini's 2.6 Ghz quad-core Intel Core i7?

    Thanks in advance for the assistance. :)
     
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  3. Kim Olesen

    Kim Olesen New Member

    Max it out with ram and you have a great workstation. It should be a significant gain on your 2007 mac pro.
     
  4. Kim Olesen

    Kim Olesen New Member

    It should be said that i run my stuff on a similar mac mini and it just smokes. DON'T order fusion drive. Some users are reporting issues with those and audio production.
     
  5. Blastmage

    Blastmage New Member

    Kim O,

    A very helpful response, thank you!
     
  6. Kim Olesen

    Kim Olesen New Member

    You are welcome :)
     
  7. gdoubleyou

    gdoubleyou Senior member

    Have you checked out Evan's Logic Benchmark test?
    http://www.gearslutz.com/board/music-computers/371545-logic-pro-multicore-benchmarktest.html

    If you get the quad i7 you will have more CPU power than your current machine.

    My 2011 quad i7 MBP is close to an early 2008 8-core MP, when using Logic .
    My next machine will be a Mini.

    :thmbup:
     
  8. Whereismymac

    Whereismymac New Member

    I just bought a Mac mini Core i7 2,6 GHz, 256 Go SSD, 8 Go of RAM and to be honest, it's a really powerful machine ! You won't regret it !!


    Envoyé de mon iPhone à l'aide de Tapatalk
     
  9. Sava66

    Sava66 New Member

    My experience

    This is my experience with MAC Mini. I bought the new version of the Quad Core 2.3 I7. The "rotational rate" of the stock hard drive was 5800. For some reason, this was not fast enough for me to run logic. It made no sense. I would get that error "system overloaded" if I had more than one track playing with no plugins. So i upgraded from 4GB to 16GB ram. The same thing happened. Someone said to upgrade my hard drive to 7200, so I ordered the 250GB SSD drive from OWC and installed it myself (along with the 1TB that is stock). All of my problems went away. Well at least for the time being. I do have a new issue, but I'll post that somewhere else.
     
  10. forsong

    forsong New Member

    I bought Mac Mini 2.3Ghz i7. Got 'system overload' error message when downloading software instrument files. But, finishing downloading, I haven't got any error message and it's just working fine. I would recommend this model to anyone who makes music.
     
  11. CSeye

    CSeye Senior member

    The Mini is a mighty powerful Mac for LPX.
    I just finished setting up a 2.6 GHz i7 Mini with user installed RAM ( 16 GB) and two internal SSD: 500 GB for OSX/apps/various user documents, and a 960 GB drive for sample libraries. Project files are on an external mechanical 7200 rpm drive via USB 3. The 1T 5400 rpm mechanical drive that came with the Mini is now an external backup drive.

    A picture always tells the story.
    First screen short is from a L9 demo tune with 80 tracks. The second is the demo that comes with LPX with 69 tracks. Both with an I/O buffer size of 128. Use of demo tunes available in Logic give us a means of standardization (all users of the same version of Logic will have them) when comparing performance on various systems.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. pfloyd714714

    pfloyd714714 Senior member

    That's valuable info, Cseye--thanks for providing it.

    I've heard conflicting advice regarding SSD drives. Some people warn against using them for audio applications. Or does that warning pertain only to project files--i.e. the recording of audio files? I ask because I'm looking to replace the two external drives I use, one for samples and the other for audio files.

    Jim
     
  13. CSeye

    CSeye Senior member

    My understandingis that SSD are better for sample libraries as the drive is only reading them. So get an SSD drive for your samples and a 7200 rpm mechanical drive for audio.

    This link may provide some additional information: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2043634/how-to-stretch-the-life-of-your-ssd-storage.html

    If cost is an issue (it's always an issue!!!), a 7200 rpm mechanical drive will work just fine for your sample libraries.

    Wally
     
  14. pfloyd714714

    pfloyd714714 Senior member

    Thanks again. I shall do some reading...

    Jim
     
  15. mmoston

    mmoston New Member

    Hi everyone, -
    I'm considering a similar move but from the same MP. CSeye, you mentioned dual SSD drives in your Mac Mini- is that a computer with OS X server? The people at Apple told me that the second drive can only be used for the server. Is that not correct?
    Thanks,
    Maxim
     
  16. CSeye

    CSeye Senior member

    In my case, I purchased a standard 2012 Mac Mini with a single internal hard drive. The internal drive was replaced and a second drive added via the OWC Data Double for the Mac Mini.

    Although I have a fair tolerance to tinkering, this was by far, the most risky procedure to date. Many steps involving manipulating delicate connectors. I'm not advising anyone to do this.

    OWC has an excellent video "how to" videos. A good approach would be to view them, then reconsider if it's worth the risk. Often, the smart move is to just forget about it.

    Some have said that the factory 5400 rpm drive is good enough for Mac OSX and apps like Logic. Everything else (sample libraries and project files) can be on external USB3 drives.

    Replacing the internal drive (without adding a second drive) is somewhat easier than going through all of the steps to add the second drive. But not really easy!

    Perhaps a more sensible option would be to pay OWC to do the installation, a service they offer for the Mac Mini.
     
  17. mmoston

    mmoston New Member

    Wow. Good to know. Thanks for that.
     

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