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Logic 9 Question Regarding Unpack

Discussion in 'Logic 9' started by Section31, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. Section31

    Section31 New Member

    Greetings.

    I use comps all the time in Logic and I'm wondering about the unpack feature.

    I know that when I unpack a take folder it puts all the individual takes onto their own tracks, and that all of the tracks are using the same channel strip.

    Why would I want to do this??? In the Logic manual it says that if I do unpack the take folder in this manner that "Any edits made to one of these tracks will be reflected in all others." This doesn't seem to be working for me.

    So, here's what I did: I recorded 4 takes into a take folder and then created a comp from those 4 takes. Then I unpacked the take (comp) folder. Now, I see the comp track and all 4 of the original takes on their own tracks (all using the same channel strip). I then went to take 2 and cut out some of the audio in the region. this did NOTHING to reflect anywhere else. The comp track still contains the audio from take 2 even after I removed the audio from the take 2 track.

    Obviously I don't quite get why I would ever want to unpack in this manner. It seems to me that you should always unpack to new tracks. This way you can use different plug-ins if you wanted.

    So, I guess what I'm looking for is a better explanation as to why I would unpack rather than unpack to new tracks.

    Thanks very much in advance for any help you can give me.
     
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  3. georgelegeriii

    georgelegeriii Senior member

    I think you misread something.

    "In the Logic manual it says that if I do unpack the take folder in this manner that "Any edits made to one of these tracks will be reflected in all others." This doesn't seem to be working for me."

    That would be if you were working with an alias file, not a take folder.

    A take folder (as you have seen) is used for making a comp track containing bits of the tracks in it. When complete, you would usually either just leave as is (all tracks available in the folder so you can either create an alternate comp, or fix the one you have later), of you would export to a new track.

    One would normally unpack a take folder if they decided that they didn't want to use the swipe track feature, and do their comp another way, or maybe to use the tracks as a double ot triple track thing, or maybe do exactly what you suggested: add different FX to each part of what was inside a take folder.

    Once you have unpacked a take folder, the individual tracks that were inside no longer effect the other: if you cut one track it doesn't do anything to any of the other tracks that were in the take folder in any way, as you have discovered. not sure how you got that idea.

    Hope that helps...
     
  4. Section31

    Section31 New Member

    That would be if you were working with an alias file, not a take folder.

    Thanks for responding quickly George.

    I've been looking at the Logic Pro 9 User Manual .pdf that I downloaded directly from the Apple support pages.

    I've attached page 518 of the .pdf so you can see what I've been looking at regarding the unpack feature. It says nothing regarding alias files. Maybe this is a typo from Apple.

    Anyway, thanks for replying. I figured the unpack option was something I'd never really use anyway.

    Cheers.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. georgelegeriii

    georgelegeriii Senior member

    Bad choice of words on apples part. Yes they are wrong in the manual.
     
  6. Eli

    Eli Senior member

    Yes, it is a bad choice of words on Apple's part and is misleading. I think what they are trying to say is that the tracks are all playing back through the same channel strip. And if you alter (edit) any channel strip or plug-in parameters, those changes will be reflected on all those cloned tracks of the original channel strip.
     

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